Vascular access (peripheral venous)

Vascular access (peripheral venous)

The peripheral venous catheter is a catheter used for short-term intravenous drug therapy by using the veins of the forearm and back of the hand. More than 80% of hospitalized patients receive intravenous (IV) treatment.

Vascular access is the process of inserting a catheter into the vein to create a direct access route between the circulatory system and the external environment to make applications such as drugs, serum, total parenteral nutrition and blood transfusion to the patients.

The vascular access is established to peripheral or central veins. Veins on the hands and feet can be preferred for short-term treatments such as 1-2 hours or a few days. The veins used in intravenous applications are generally are the veins in the arms, forearms, hands, feet, forehead and in babies; the scalp. The veins in these regions are more suitable because they are large and superficial, the skin is thin, the vein slips, and there is enough connective tissue to prevent blood from leaking out of the vein.